Luis Fitch’s 12 jumbo-sized art prints are now part of the permanent collection at The National Museum of Mexican Art.

Luis Fitch’s 12 jumbo-sized art prints are now part of the permanent collection at The National Museum of Mexican Art.

The National Museum of Mexican Art (NMMA) in Chicago, Illinois collects Luis Fitch’s ‘Day of Souls’ 12-piece serigraph portfolio for their permanent collection.

The National Museum of Mexican Art is one of the most prominent first-voice institutions for Mexican art and culture in the United States. It is home to one of the country’s largest Mexican art collections and is the only Latino museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The NMMA features pieces from ancient to modern as well as hosts cultural programs like dance, music, and theater to share the richness and diversity of Mexican culture.

Luis Fitch is an international artist, designer, mentor and creative entrepreneur. He is currently the co-founder and creative director of UNO Branding, a multicultural branding and design agency. Raised in Tijuana, Mexico, Luis moved to the U.S. in 1985 where he attended the prestigious Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He graduated in 1990 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.

While enjoying great success with commercial art through his agency, UNO, his personal artwork has been presented both domestically and internationally in over 100 collections throughout Latin America and the United States. “ It’s a tremendous honor to have my 12 pieces be part of the permanent collection at The National Museum of Mexican Art, a place so passionately dedicated to showcasing and promoting the beauty and richness of Mexican art and culture”, says Fitch.

For more information regarding Luis Fitch or to request an image from this portfolio, please visit http://www.luisfitch.com

By |2017-09-14T17:38:39+00:00September 14th, 2017|AIGA, art, Google, Luis Fitch|Comments Off on Luis Fitch’s 12 jumbo-sized art prints are now part of the permanent collection at The National Museum of Mexican Art.